How the Great Depression affected the farmers and share croppers of Gwinnett County

5.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.3/314546
Title:
How the Great Depression affected the farmers and share croppers of Gwinnett County
Authors:
Harris, Justin
Abstract:
This paper studies the rates of farm ownership and economic growth of both African American and Caucasian farmers/sharecroppers living in Gwinnett County both before and after the Great Depression. Some of the factors in the declining rates of farms include war, economic turmoil, and changing agricultural policies. Sharecroppers, mostly African American farmers, were hit particularly hard by shifting farming fortunes, being forced into a life of debt by the biased farming system. African Americans experienced devastating conditions during the Great Depression, unable to find work as most of the jobs normally reserved for them were quickly being occupied by Caucasians. As the nation shifted from an agricultural to an industrial society after the changes caused by the Great Depression and World War II, farming in the south was no longer beneficial for African Americans or Caucasians.
Publisher:
Georgia Gwinnett College
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.3/314546
Language:
en
Description:
How the Great Depression affected the farmers and share croppers of Gwinnett County by Justin Harris
Appears in Collections:
History 3150 - Dr. Michael Gagnon

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Justinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-24T17:05:49Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-24T17:05:49Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.3/314546-
dc.descriptionHow the Great Depression affected the farmers and share croppers of Gwinnett County by Justin Harrisen_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper studies the rates of farm ownership and economic growth of both African American and Caucasian farmers/sharecroppers living in Gwinnett County both before and after the Great Depression. Some of the factors in the declining rates of farms include war, economic turmoil, and changing agricultural policies. Sharecroppers, mostly African American farmers, were hit particularly hard by shifting farming fortunes, being forced into a life of debt by the biased farming system. African Americans experienced devastating conditions during the Great Depression, unable to find work as most of the jobs normally reserved for them were quickly being occupied by Caucasians. As the nation shifted from an agricultural to an industrial society after the changes caused by the Great Depression and World War II, farming in the south was no longer beneficial for African Americans or Caucasians.en_US
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorgia Gwinnett Collegeen_US
dc.subjectHarris, Justinen_US
dc.subjectGreat Depressionen_US
dc.subjectFarmersen_US
dc.subjectSharecroppersen_US
dc.subjectAfrican Americansen_US
dc.subjectWorld War IIen_US
dc.titleHow the Great Depression affected the farmers and share croppers of Gwinnett Countyen
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