Understanding Artful Behavior as a Human Proclivity: Clues from a Pre-Kindergarten Classroom

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.3/294713
Title:
Understanding Artful Behavior as a Human Proclivity: Clues from a Pre-Kindergarten Classroom
Authors:
Blatt-Gross, Carolina
Abstract:
Concurrent to the present reduction of arts education in mainstream American schools, many evolutionary-minded scholars are asserting that artistic behavior contributes significantly to cognition, has been advantageous for our survival, and satisfies psychological needs that are biologically embedded. Supported by long-term and wide-spread art making among the human species and the spontaneous artful behaviors of children, this cross-disciplinary study explores the possibility that artful behaviors represent an inherent part of human nature. Based on an ethological understanding of art (that is, as a behavior rather than an object), this research uses an interpretivist lens and phenomenological design with the ultimate goal of exploring how such proclivities might inform educational policy and practice. Data collection methods include a combination of observation, participant observation, and teacher interviews in a state-funded pre-kindergarten classroom.
Affiliation:
Georgia Gwinnett College
Citation:
Blatt-Gross, C. (2011). Understanding artful behavior as a human proclivity: Clues from a pre-kindergarten classroom. Journal for Learning through the Arts, 7(1).
Publisher:
Center for Learning in the Arts, Sciences and Sustainability, UC Irvine
Journal:
Journal of Learning through the Arts
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.3/294713
Additional Links:
http://escholarship.org/uc/item/4pm02938
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
Art Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBlatt-Gross, Carolinaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-26T19:10:59Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-26T19:10:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationBlatt-Gross, C. (2011). Understanding artful behavior as a human proclivity: Clues from a pre-kindergarten classroom. Journal for Learning through the Arts, 7(1).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.3/294713-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent to the present reduction of arts education in mainstream American schools, many evolutionary-minded scholars are asserting that artistic behavior contributes significantly to cognition, has been advantageous for our survival, and satisfies psychological needs that are biologically embedded. Supported by long-term and wide-spread art making among the human species and the spontaneous artful behaviors of children, this cross-disciplinary study explores the possibility that artful behaviors represent an inherent part of human nature. Based on an ethological understanding of art (that is, as a behavior rather than an object), this research uses an interpretivist lens and phenomenological design with the ultimate goal of exploring how such proclivities might inform educational policy and practice. Data collection methods include a combination of observation, participant observation, and teacher interviews in a state-funded pre-kindergarten classroom.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCenter for Learning in the Arts, Sciences and Sustainability, UC Irvineen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://escholarship.org/uc/item/4pm02938en_US
dc.subjectart educationen_US
dc.subjecthuman natureen_US
dc.subjectcognitionen_US
dc.subjectevolutionen_US
dc.subjectphenomenologyen_US
dc.subjectartistic behavioren_US
dc.subjectethologyen_US
dc.titleUnderstanding Artful Behavior as a Human Proclivity: Clues from a Pre-Kindergarten Classroomen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeorgia Gwinnett Collegeen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Learning through the Artsen_US
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